Comment

THE CRYSTAL BALL OF SPORTS MEDICINE/STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN PRO SPORT

It's hard enough to break in and stay in when it comes to sports medicine/strength & conditioning in professional sport. It's damn near impossible if you aren't speaking the current languages and don't understand today's currency. Let's gaze into the crystal ball of sports medicine and performance at the pro level so you can enter and function in this new territory like a boss! 

The list of changes within sports medicine/performance at the pro sport level is growing each day. For this post I'm going to target 3 areas of evolution:

1. eyes for movement

Most people assume that pro athletes wouldn't make it to the pros without great movement skills. Wrong! Many pro athletes get to the top levels despite their movement flaws. They rely on exceptional sport skill and raw athleticism to make up for limited fundamental movement skills. This is a deadly combination because lots of horsepower without basic movement skills is normally part of the injury equation. 

To further emphasize my point let me summarize my training philosophy in 1 sentence: "Learn to move, and learn to move heavy things responsibly." The best in this field all have something in common - they have eyes for movement. The value on observation, evaluation, and the ability teach movement at a high level is only going to keep growing moving forward. Make this a priority if you want to function within a sports medicine/performance staff at the pro sport level. 

2. languages of rehab

You better be able to speak "rehab" if you want to call a spot on a pro sports medicine/performance staff home. This is a touchy subject for some but the fact is that physical therapists are showing up more and more on pro sports medicine/performance staffs. This might be good, bad, or ugly but that's a different topic for a different post. I'm not saying you need to be a licensed physical therapist, but I am saying you need to be able to hold a high level clinical conversation with a skilled PT. 

In addition to speaking "rehab" you better be able to link your skill set to the rehab process. In other words, if you're not a PT then you better have PT-like skills. Like it or not, this is where the field is headed. 

3. respect sports science

Just to clarify, testing out the latest wearable technology on yourself or your athletes doesn't make you a sports scientist. I have no respect for the abuse of the term "sports science," but I have loads of respect for what that term truly and responsibly refers to. 


LIKE WHAT YOU READ? SIGN UP NOW TO GET THE LATEST TIPS AND ADVICE

Name *
Name

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS spent 6 seasons as the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach of the Los Angeles Lakers and is the founder of TD Athletes Edge.  He is nationally renowned for his evidence-based and scientific approach to fitness, training, nutrition, and recovery for athletes and fitness enthusiasts.

For training and nutrition advice, follow us on:

• Instagram http://instagram.com/tdathletesedge
• Twitter http://twitter.com/tdathletesedge
• Facebook http://www.facebook.com/tdathletesedge
• YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/tdifranc1
• Podcast http://www.tdathletesedge.com/podcast
• Website http://www.tdathletesedge.com

Comment

Comment

4 HOTEL WORKOUTS TO HELP YOU KEEP YOUR GAINS ON THE ROAD

Walking into a hotel gym for the first time can be like landing on a new planet. You frantically scan the room for anything that looks familiar and then start trying to figure out how you're going to recreate your workout for the day in this new - and often limited - environment. 

During the course of an NBA season, you can expect somewhere between 40-60 hotel stays. As the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach of the LA Lakers, this translates to 40-60 different times per season that I need to plan workouts for 15 NBA players in hotel fitness rooms. The trick to keeping your training gains going despite a whirlwind of travel and ill-equipped fitness rooms is as simple as having a workout for any situation. 

The following 4 workouts will have you checking into any hotel like a baller knowing that your gym routine will stay strong regardless of your travel plans:

workout #1: cable machine

This workout is designed to help you crush it in the hotel fitness room that offers nothing but a treadmill, a few pink dumbbells and a cable machine:

  • A1 - Cable Deadlift Pull Through (4x15)
  • A2 - Cable Standing Single Arm Row (4x6)
  • B1 - Cable Bowler Squat with Row (4x6)
  • B2 - Cable Half-Kneel Lift (4x12)

workout #2: dumbbells up to 50lb

Here's a workout that has you primed for a great pump in a hotel fitness room that doesn't have much, but at least they have dumbbells up to 50 pounds:

  • A1 - Dumbbell Bench Press (4x12)
  • A2 - Bench Push-Up Squeeze (4x6)
  • B1 - Suitcase Standup (4x5)
  • B2 - Dumbbell Prone Row (4x15)

workout #3: bodyweight only

Whether you don't have time to leave your room or the hotel fitness center has nothing but an elliptical and yoga mat, here is a workout that requires no equipment:

  • A1 - Feet Elevated Push-Up (4x10)
  • A2 - Rear Foot Elevated Lunge (4x6)
  • B1 - Sidelying Hip Drive (4x10)
  • B2 - Lateral Bear Crawl (4x4) *4 steps each direction

workout #4: bring your own equipment (BYOE)

Pack a few pieces of light equipment, like a pair of Val Slides or SKLZ Slidez and a resistance band so you can get your work in anywhere. Here's the BYOE workout that will help you keep your gains coming: 

  • A1 - Band Resisted Push-Up (4x8)
  • A2 - Slider Retro Lunge (4x12)
  • B1 - Side Plank with Row (4x20)
  • B2 - Slider Bridge to Ham-Curl (4x6)

*Workout Notes:

  • Perform a sufficient dynamic warm-up prior to your workout. 
  • Complete all "A1" and "A2" sets and then complete "B1" and "B2" sets.
  • Maintain perfect form throughout each set.
  • Starting with less than 4 sets and progressing up to 4 is absolutely appropriate.

bonus workout: treadmill interval set

If there is a treadmill available here's a 7 minute high intensity interval workout that can act as it's own workout if time is limited or be a great finisher to any of the workouts above:

  • 2 minute warm-up at walk/jog pace
  • Set 1 - 10 second run/10 second rest
  • Set 2 - 15 second run/15 second rest
  • Set 3 - 20 second run/20 second rest
  • Set 4 - 30 second run/30 second rest
  • Set 5 - 30 second run/2 minute cool down at walk/jog pace

*Treadmill Workout Notes:

  • Set incline between 2-6 based on what feels challenging but reasonable.
  • Set speed between 7mph-12mph based on what feels challenging but reasonable. 
  • Adjust both speed and incline throughout workout based on what feels challenging but reasonable. 
  • During rest intervals carefully hop feet off to the side of the belt.

Like what you read?  
Sign up now to get the latest tips and advice

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS spent 6 seasons as the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach of the Los Angeles Lakers and is the founder of TD Athletes Edge.  He is nationally renowned for his evidence-based and scientific approach to fitness, training, nutrition, and recovery for athletes and fitness enthusiasts.

For training and nutrition advice, follow us on:
• Twitter http://twitter.com/tdathletesedge
• Facebook http://www.facebook.com/tdathletesedge
• Instagram http://instagram.com/tdathletesedge
• YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/tdifranc1
• Sign up for our newsletter and follow our blog at http://www.tdathletesedge.com

Comment

TODAY'S EDGE: STOP IGNORING YOUR SOLEUS

1 Comment

TODAY'S EDGE: STOP IGNORING YOUR SOLEUS

Today's Edge: Stop ignoring your soleus muscle. The soleus originates on the tibia and fibula just below the knee. From there, it turns into the achilles tendon. It's hidden behind the big gastrocnemius muscle but it shouldn't be overlooked.

1 Comment

Comment

7 SECRETS TO MAKING YOUR HOTEL ROOM A SLEEP SANCTUARY

Sleep is hard on the road. Each hotel room is a different environment from your normal sleep environment. This makes it tough to stick to the routine as you prep for a good night's sleep on the road. Throw in a few time zone changes and you can consider your sleep ruined. Here are 7 tricks that I use when I enter a hotel room to set myself up for sleep success:

1. Unplug Unnecessary Electronics:
The first thing I do when I enter a hotel room is unplug the alarm clock. The light from these digital clocks seem innocent but it's more than enough light pollution to interrupt your sleep without you knowing it. Additionally, there is a good chance that the alarm hasn't been shut off from the previous guest. This can potentially set you up for a rude awakening at a time that you don't want to be waking. Another thing to consider is unplugging the television. I try to avoid turning the TV on when I stay in a hotel room. This is a slippery slope because it's all too easy to fall asleep as you're watching Sports Center for the fourth time. This is a recipe for an interrupted and low quality sleep. 

2. Travel With Black Tape:
You would be surprised at how a hotel room can be lit up from sneaky sources of light pollution. Two of the biggest offenders in this category are the peephole on the door and the green or red dot light on the fire alarm. Traveling with a roll of black theater or electrical tape is a great solution to this light pollution problem. Place a small square of this black tape over the peephole on the door and on the dot light of the fire alarm for a more sleep-friendly hotel room.

3. Block The Light From The Hallway With A Towel:
Next time you check into your hotel room, shut all of the lights off, close the curtains and look at how much light streams in from the hallway under the door. The solution to this is simple: Place a towel across the bottom of the doorway.

4. Use The Privacy Sign:
The privacy sign is there for a reason - take advantage. The last thing you need is a hotel staffer knocking on your door while you're in a restful sleep. Throw that privacy sign on the door upon arrival to make sure there's no confusion. 

5. Shut The Shades:
This may seem obvious but sometimes if it's dark outside it's easy to forget to pull the blackout shades shut. This is an important one to cover all of your bases. 

6. Turn Down The Thermostat:
Most hotels tend to be set at 70 degrees fahrenheit when you walk in. Drop that down to somewhere between 66-68 degrees fahrenheit for a better sleep temperature. A cool room is a better environment for the body while sleeping. Everyone is different so find your sweet spot under 70 degrees. If the thermostat has a fan option, place that on low or medium. This should help avoid the "auto" fan setting which can be disruptive as it turns on and off throughout the night. 

7. Sleep On The Floor:
I know this sounds crazy but all hotels have different mattresses with varying levels of firmness. A mattress that is more on the firm side tends to be best for most people to stay away from compromised sleeping postures. Additionally, your body gets used to a certain sleep surface so when a new surface is introduced it can make it hard to stick to normal sleep patterns. One solution for this mattress dilemma is to call guest services and order two extra comforters/blankets. Fold the two over in the size of a twin bed and place them on the floor. Use this to sleep on and then use the comforter from the bed to cover up with. I'll bet you'll be surprised at how comfortable this can be.


Like what you read?  
Sign up now to get the latest tips and advice

Name *
Name

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS, spent 6 seasons as Head Strength & Conditioning coach of the Lakers and is renowned nationally for his evidence-based and scientific approach to training, nutrition and recovery for athletes and fitness enthusiasts.

For training and nutrition advice, follow us on:
• Twitter http://twitter.com/tdathletesedge
• Facebook http://www.facebook.com/tdathletesedge
• Instagram http://instagram.com/tdathletesedge
• YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/tdifranc1
• Sign up for our newsletter and follow our blog at http://www.tdathletesedge.com

Comment